Category Archives: Guest Writer

Ten signs of when you need to be involved:  the Coronavirus factor

Paying attention to situations that can affect the well-being of older adults can make all the difference. The effect of the COVID19 virus has raised the risks of ignoring signs that indicate it is time to intervene.   There are ever-changing regulations, testing regimes, surges in cases, availability of vaccinations, and even access to healthcare. This … Continue reading Ten signs of when you need to be involved:  the Coronavirus factor

Dad Had A Stroke… Now What? (Part II)

In my previous blog post, we learned Mr. Smith needed skilled rehabilitation services after his stroke. His son, Paul, selected a facility near his home with the goal of his dad returning home after he received skilled rehabilitation. Mr. Smith was motivated and worked hard on his physical, occupational and speech therapy. After about three months, Paul … Continue reading Dad Had A Stroke… Now What? (Part II)

Staying Safe Post-Vaccine

After almost a year of living during a pandemic, there is finally a light at the end of the tunnel! Thanks to the rollout of vaccines for the coronavirus, we finally can hope to return to a state of normalcy by the end of the year. But it is important to continue to exercise caution … Continue reading Staying Safe Post-Vaccine

A Preventable Disaster Saddened and Frustrated Me

“Living with a Visionary” is a beautifully written essay by John Matthias, Professor Emeritus and writer, published in the New Yorker on February 1, 2021. It starts out as one of the most touching descriptions of living with a person with dementia that I have ever read. His wife, Diana, had Lewy Body Dementia and … Continue reading A Preventable Disaster Saddened and Frustrated Me

Racial Bias in Requesting Caregivers: How to rise above this problem!

“My father will not tolerate a ____________ (fill-in-the-blank) caregiver.  Can you promise me a ____________ one?” Having run a home care business for over 30 years I have heard this request many times over to my disbelief and sadness that an adult would not just want the best trained, most experienced, and kind caregiver for … Continue reading Racial Bias in Requesting Caregivers: How to rise above this problem!

Dad Had a Stroke… Now What?

Mr. Smith is 79 years old. A week ago, he had a stroke while home alone. Thankfully, his youngest son arrived minutes later and got Mr. Smith admitted to the hospital. After a week, the hospital discharge planner contacted Mr. Smith’s oldest son, Paul, who is listed as his healthcare POA (Power of Attorney). The … Continue reading Dad Had a Stroke… Now What?

Tips on Mask-wearing for People With Dementia

Although the temptation is strong now that vaccines are gaining distribution to become more relaxed about COVID-19 prevention, we cannot afford to let down our guards and stop masking up. In the United States, the CDC recommends anyone older than age 2 wear a mask, but there are many who are resistant to wearing one, … Continue reading Tips on Mask-wearing for People With Dementia

Crisis Management and Beyond: Social Workers in Aging Life Care

With March as Social Work Month, we love highlighting our Aging Life Care Professionals(r) with this background. Here is a piece from member Susan Valoff. Originally appearing last year at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, we can see how social workers still are offering a unique level of care one … Continue reading Crisis Management and Beyond: Social Workers in Aging Life Care

Financially Helping Clients Fund Their Care Needs: Real Life Examples

Aging Life Care Professionals(r) are called upon to assist clients with resources to handle their particular situations, including evaluating the financial resources necessary to help clients ensure quality care and an optimal life.  Did you know that 500,000 seniors a year will walk away from their life insurance policies?  This happens because they no longer … Continue reading Financially Helping Clients Fund Their Care Needs: Real Life Examples

On Dementia: Care, Community and Creativity

Conversations of hope, joy, and better ways to care for and support individuals living with dementia and their care partners More than 5 million Americans live with Alzheimer’s disease and over 15 million family members, friends and volunteers serve as care partners, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Individuals with Alzheimer’s and other dementias do not … Continue reading On Dementia: Care, Community and Creativity